PERPICH PERPICH

Residential Life

The opportunity to attend a residential school at this point in your student's life is a good stepping stone toward college. Dorm life at Perpich is similar in many way to dorm life at a university or art school--with more restrictions. We take our responsibility of caring for them seriously. We invite you to initiate conversations, express concerns and raise questions at any time with the dormitory staff and/or the school director, whom you may contact through student services.

You will miss them

And they will miss you. However, parents tell us living in the residence hall added to their children’s maturity, ability to resolve issues on their own and their basic life skills such as cooking, laundry and housekeeping. 

Visits from parents

The residence hall has two bedrooms reserved for the free use of family members visiting their children. These are primarily to allow family who live greater distances from the school to stay overnight in order to see performances, readings or exhibits of their students’ work at the school.

Boys and girls together

The residence hall at Perpich is three floors with the male students’ rooms on the first floor and the female students’ rooms on the second and third floors. Students of both genders are allowed to mingle in the public areas under supervision. Anyone visiting students at the dorm must sign in and remain in the public areas of the residence hall.

Bedrooms and baths

Each bedroom is designed for two roommates, holding two single beds, two wardrobes and two student desks with chairs. The bathrooms are designed to be used by four students. Each wing of each floor has “quads” with eight bedrooms and four baths and a central open area that serves as a common area for students to gather to socialize or study together.

Facilities in the building

The residence hall has a full kitchen and a recreation room with large-screen television and table games on the first floor. The building has two laundry facilities, one on the first and one on the second floor and a workout room with treadmills and other machines on the second floor. In addition, the second floor has the “rumpus room,” a smaller rec area with television and an area with tables for eating or studying. The second floor has a computer lab where students may work on homework or research assignments.

What should a student bring to the dorm and what shouldn't they bring?

SUGGESTED THINGS TO BRING TO THE PERPICH RESIDENCE HALL 
1. A reliable alarm clock 
2. Clothes hangers 
3. Big key chain to keep track of keys 
4. Quarters for laundry 
5. Stamps 
6. Envelopes, stationary, tape, scissors, stapler, batteries and charger cords needed for electronic devices 
7. Basic first aid supplies (bandages, heating pad, cold packs, dehumidifier or vaporizer, humidifier, ace bandages, sunscreen) and personal toiletries 
8. A floor or desk lamp with light bulbs to fit the specific wattage required for the lamp. Paper lampshades, halogen lamps, clip-on or wrap lamps are prohibited due to fire risk.
9. Blankets, pillows and pillowcases, twin-sized mattress pad and sheets. Mattresses are 74” x 38” and the bed has a 16” clearance for under-bed storage. 
10. Towels, washcloths, hand towels and toiletry items
11. Cup, plate, small dishes, eating utensils, cookware to use in kitchen microwave and stove or oven (stored in residence hall rooms when not in use), dish soap. Plastic bins with lids are required to store all nonperishable food items kept in residence hall room.
12. Laundry detergent, basket and iron -- with automatic turn-off only. Ironing boards are provided in laundry rooms 
13. Small refrigerator (no larger than 3.6 cubic feet in size) is allowed; to promote energy efficiency older models (dating before 2006) are prohibited.
14. A robe to wear to and from bathroom and crate or bag to transport personal toiletries to and from bathroom. Personal items may not be left in bathrooms. 
15. Bathroom rug (optional) 
16. Small electric fan 
17. UL-approved power strip with surge protector (extension cords are prohibited) 
18. Bicycle lock (if you bring a bicycle) 
19. Thumb tacks or Plasti-Tak if you plan to decorate walls (many walls are brick); adhesive remover 
20. Personal recreational equipment if desired: tennis equipment (parks nearby), softball glove and ball, soccer equipment, basketball, swimsuit (swimming at the nearby community center) 
TIP: Residents are encouraged to coordinate with roommates to avoid duplications (i.e., TV, stereo) and before bringing large pieces of furniture such as an easy chair. Rooms are approximately 11’ x 17’ in size (187 sq. ft.). 
 
THINGS NOT TO BRING TO THE RESIDENCE HALL -- THESE ITEMS WILL BE CONFISCATED 
1. Alcoholic beverage containers and/or drug paraphernalia (wine bottles, poppers, pipes) are not allowed in rooms for decoration or otherwise. Such items (even empty) found in rooms can subject students to a suspension or cancellation of the residence hall contract per the chemical use policy (pg. 45).
2. Soft drink bottles or cans that are look-alike alcoholic beverage containers
3. Any open heating elements or items that can cause combustion: popcorn poppers, hot plates, coffee pots, microwaves, heaters, electric potpourri pots, extension cords, toasters or other heat-producing electrical appliances not listed 
4. Candles, incense, matches; cigarettes, lighters
5. Halogen or mercury light bulbs 
6. Spray paint or any oil-based paint (these items must be stored at school if needed) 
7. Super-soaker water guns or any toy weapon (gun, knife etc.) 
8. No pets 
9. Audio/visual material (VHS tapes, DVDs, video games) or printed materials (posters, photos) that depict sexual acts, nudity in sexual context, repetitive profanity or extreme violence and gore (body mutilation/blood) are strictly prohibited in the residence hall. 
10. AVOID BRINGING ITEMS OF EXTREME MONETARY OR SENTIMENTAL VALUE (JEWELRY, CASH, EXPENSIVE ART PIECES, ETC.) Although rooms should be kept locked at all times, we cannot guarantee the safety of personal items. The Center assumes no responsibility for lost, stolen or damaged personal property.
 

Supervision

The dorm is supervised 24 hours a day and the campus has a security guard onsite. A nurse is on staff every weekday morning. Each year 10-12 students have the opportunity to serve as residence assistants on their floors.

Curfew and access

Curfew is at 10:30 p.m. on school nights and, for those students who stay over on weekends, the curfew is midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. During the day, the dorm is locked and students may return only if they have a pass either to pick up forgotten items needed for school or if they are sick.

Recreation

Residence hall staff organize activities for free time such as an annual Halloween party, board game nights, shopping expeditions and movie nights. They also provide organized transportation for recreational destinations.

The residence hall is a privilege

Along with the rewards of living on campus, it is important to know there are expectations to be aware of before your child commits to being a resident student. Parents and students are encouraged to thoroughly read the Student/Parent Handbook together either on this website or when you receive the hard copy, usually at registration. Living on campus is a privilege that can, and will, be revoked for students who disregard established policies and expectations.

“For 17 years I’d carried the bulk of my childrens’ education myself.  Sending the two oldest away to Perpich was a huge step of faith and I have not been disappointed.  The teachers, in particular, have been fabulous!"
— Merri Mickelson, parent

What parents have to say about residential life

“Our greatest concern about sending our daughter to live at the dorm was, of course, her safety... The dorm is set up very securely with a set of very reasonable yet strict rules; our daughter wanted to attend the arts high school badly enough that she was willing to follow those rules... Our daughter has learned to balance her life on her own, to live with other people and their differences and she's felt a little freedom.”

“Our greatest concern was not being able to supervise [our son] during these vulnerable years... What resolved our concerns were our observations of how attentive the staff was to the residents. They initiated contact with us as needed. They asked all the ‘right’ questions that showed us they understand kids and understand parents... We feel we've continued to have close intimate connection with our son despite the distance. And the dorm staff fosters it.”

Read more about Perpich parents' experiences